The Solopreneur Sales Challenge For the World

Solopreneur sales loom heavy. 

When I first got into this, I quickly realized that my sales process is different. Instead of the days I spent strictly selling and all that went with it, I now had to sell and deliver what I was selling. Plus it was clear that the weight of each sale was massive, and I was the salesperson, the marketer, and the service provider. And I didn’t get into this to sell.

I liked doing a thing (writing), but I couldn’t get paid to do the thing unless I sold.

After selling, advising, and writing for several years now, it’s clear why solopreneur sales are especially difficult.

Why Solopreneur Sales Are So Different

I’m the product. There’s no product to provide cover if I screw up. If I’m selling a product, my customer may forgive my bluster during the sales process. The product may be attractive enough on its own, even if my sales process is less than impressive. Since I’m selling services, the impression prospects get during the sales process is identical to the impression they have of me as a service provider.

Clumsy process, low credibility. My sales process itself is the biggest piece of information a prospect has about me other than my marketing materials. If the process is clumsy, they’ll likely assume my service is clumsy, too.

It can’t happen fast enough. My sales process felt too slow until I could come from a place of abundance and calm. This upped the pressure I put on myself and my prospect. There appeared to be a need for deals to move quickly so I wouldn’t “waste time” during the sales process.

I was too invested in the outcome. This is my livelihood I’m talking about here! It felt impossible to separate myself from getting the big win, even with healthy lead flow.

I can’t recover from a bad first impression. As a solopreneur, I don’t have staff that supports me or interact with a prospect. The impression I leave on a prospect is all they’ll ever see. If I screw it up, I’m screwed.

More sales, less time. Paradoxically, sales introduce a new constraint on my time as a solopreneur. Just like client work, I have to spend time doing sales, sometimes at the expense of client work or my own marketing. It’s easy to start to see sales as a chore rather than an opportunity to help interesting new people and companies.

I’m on my own. There’s no proposal writer or admin staff in my office, waiting to help crank out another winning sales pitch. As a solopreneur, I need to be ready to move fast and without the support of others.

All of this can be changed with the right process and leverage. What I’ve learned changed everything about solopreneur sales for me, and I’ll share it with you…tomorrow. Hang tight.